The Havilah Herald

Official Publication of the Havilah Centennial Group, Inc.

aka The Havilah Historical Society and Museum

Havilah California – October 2019

A recognized 501 C 3 non-profit Historical Organization (all donations are tax-deductible)

Dedicated to the preservation of the history of Havilah,

The first County Seat of Kern County, CA

Our Purpose:

The purpose of this corporation is EDUCATIONAL. The organization has been formed and is maintained to research, document, preserve, and share the historic legacy of the town of Havilah, California, and of Kern County, California. Included in this purpose is the objective to provide for the advancement of education about the history of Havilah and early Kern County to the local community at large and to any and all visitors to the community.

               

THE PREZ SEZ

For October 2019

Just a reminder, nominations of officers will begin at the October meeting, and will close, then have the voting at the November meeting.  We don’t normally have a December business meeting, but will have the “Holiday Party” in December.

Yes, the normal museum hours have stopped at the end of September, but then we are looking forward to our “History Day in Havilah” on Saturday, October 26th from 10 am until 3 pm. Another BIG THANK YOU to Mark and Dorothy Mutz, for the great publicizing they have done for us in their Fence Post “Country Reader” for our History Day!  One change — we can’t sell hot dogs without getting an additional license/permit from the County, and food liability insurance. So at the September meeting we voted instead to offer snacks like cookies, cupcakes, brownies, and / or chips – for a donation.

Jayne and I have a friend, and fellow member of the ECV, Dr. Gregg Wilkerson, Senior Geologist for the State of California’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM), who is also teaching geology at Bakersfield College.  Dr. Gregg contacted me a week or so ago and said his class has grown; he now has 94 students, and would appreciate it if he could call us in advance and have us open the museums several times between now and the end of the year.  I told him to give us a call and if Jayne or I cannot be there, we will ask some of our other volunteers to come and open up the museums for them.  They visited twice last year, and each time left $40 or more in donations.

Still no striping over Hooper Hill, but THANK YOU Red Bolt for all your efforts in trying to make this happen.  We heard back from Michelle Burns-Lusich, the Kern County Public Works Manager, who says:  “it ain’t gonna’ happen” (my rephrasing, but essentially what she said).  I’m pretty sure you’ll see her entire reply a little further in this newsletter.  (Thank you, Janet.)

Looking forward to seeing all your smiling faces at the October meeting, Saturday, Oct. 12th, at 3 pm in the Havilah School house, and again at the Havilah History Day, Saturday, Oct. 26th from 10 am until 3 pm.  It’s going to be fun and very informative         

 — Prez Al

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Following is the reply Prez Al referred to in the above President’s Message regarding the striping (or lack thereof) on Hooper Hill, from Michelle Burns-Lusich of the Kern County Public Works Department:

Hello Mr. Bolt,

Debbie Freeland asked me to share information with you regarding Caliente-Bodfish Road (Hooper Road).

The potholes have been patched.  If any additional potholes resurface, please feel free to report them by calling 671-862-8890 or by reporting online at www.kernpublicworks.com/report.

Regarding the center line striping on Caliente-Bodfish Road, Hooper Hill, Public Works received a similar concern in September of 2017.  We looked back in our records, and this road has never had a center line stripe on Hooper Hill.  The reason is because this segment of road is not wide enough to stripe a center line.  CHP was contacted, and they agreed the road is too narrow to stripe.  In October of 2017, four and a half miles of the road was striped with edge line along the cliff side to improve safety.

Thank you for reaching out with the concerns.  I hope this information is helpful.

Best regards,

Michelle Burns-Lusich

Publish Works Manager

Public Works Department

270 “M” Street, Suite 400

Bakersfield, CA 93301

 

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DEADWOOD DICK   The following is the last excerpt from the Book Law of the Desert Born, 1983, by well-known Western author, Louis L’Amour:

Among black riders famous for their skills were Matthew (Bones) Hooks, Nigger Add, Bronco Sam Stewart, and, of course, in later days, Bill Pickett, who invented bulldogging.

There has been much talk about Deadwood Dick, but there was no such person.  He was a creation of a writer of dime novels, Edward L. Wheeler, who wrote for Beadle & Adams.  Many men claimed to be the original Deadwood Dick, and Richard Clarke, of Deadwood, South Dakota, was selected by the city fathers to play the part.  Bert Bell, a publicity man prepared the stories and found the outfit of clothes Clarke was to wear.  He was sent east to invite Calvin Coolidge, then president, to Deadwood.  Clarke succeeded so well that he never gave up the role of Deadwood Dick.

In 1927, when Clarke was selected to play the part there were few horses on the streets of Deadwood and a great many cars.  There is no evidence that Richard Clarke ever fired a rifle or pistol in his life, but suddenly, through Bell’s efforts, he became a celebrity.  There were free drinks, free meals, and a much  better life than he’d known, and Clarke was wise enough to accept what the gods – and Bert Bell – had given.  He played Deadwood Dick until his death.

 

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HISTORY DAY IN HAVILAH

SATURDAY OCTOBER 26, 2019, 10 AM UNTIL 3 PM

53rd year for the Havilah Historical Society / Havilah Centennial Group, Inc.

WHERE? Historical Havilah Courthouse and Grounds at 6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road, Havilah, CA.

OLD WEST FUN:

 

1866 Courthouse and 1868 Schoolhouse (replicas) – Museums open for viewing

Walking tour of the historic main street of Havilah

Walking tour of the first cemetery in Kern County (St. Joseph’s)

Live music (“Out of the Blue”)

Snacks, cookies, chips, brownies, etc. available for a donation

Flint knapping demonstrations

Morse code display and demonstrations

Local Native American Groups have been invited to participate

Periodic presentations of the last Old West Shootout in the street in Havilah (April 24, 1905) Walker’s/Burton’s/Gibson’s

Rock and mineral display —- if you have a rock or mineral that you’d like identified, bring it and you’ll find out!

50 – 50 Drawing at 2:30 pm, you don’t have to be present, but we will need your name and phone number !

Smokey Bear says he plans on being there! How about YOU?

ADMISSION IS FREE — For more information call 661-867-2414

 

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Following is another article from the Old Timer’s Column published in the Wofford Heights Kern River Valley Review by the Ghost Writer (Edith Long, whose parents were Jim and Pearl Bechtel) on Sept. 10, 1970:

 

The fall of the year was always a busy time at the Pack Stations.  It was time to get ready for the hunting season – huge stacks of supplies needed to be readied to fill the mule packs that carried them into the high country hunting camps.  The animals had to be shod, or shoes replaced, and the mules needed to be fed rations of rolled barley twice a day to build up their strength for the arduous task of climbing the trails for most of the hunting season.

The wranglers checked and repaired equipment, as once the season began there would be no time for repairs of any kind.  As soon as the hunters arrived to their camp, the animals and Wrangler returned to the Station for the next hunting party waiting to be packed in.  There was constantly one train going in and one coming out.

The hunters consisted mostly of wealthy men from Los Angeles, Beverly Hills, Hollywood, and San Francisco.  They came overly well equipped with camping and hunting paraphernalia, especially if this was their first trip to the high county.  The wrangler would then refuse to take the “frills” which first timers considered necessary.  Others, who became seasoned hunters returning year after year, knew what was needed and became used to roughing it. 

Guides, wranglers, and all hands needed, were up long before the breakfast bell.  The horses were saddled and ready, having had their rolled oats from nose feed bags while the people were having their breakfast.  Then they were assigned to riders for the day.  Stirrups were adjusted to meet the requirements of the riders, and then they were on their way with a trail guide.

The packers and wranglers who packed the mules with supplies had to be sure the pack was evenly distributed.  Some mules tolerated more weight than others and the packers had to know their animals!  The mules had their “likes and dislikes” and nothing, but nothing, could change their minds!  They had ways and means of getting rid of packs they didn’t like.  The necessity of needing these mules with their sure footedness, and their strength and stamina, led to allowing the animals to get their own way, but many a time wranglers and packers couldn’t find adequate “words” to express their feelings for these obstinate, unchanging, pack carrying animals!

The trail guides had their troubles with the riders.  One guide had a rider complain his reins were becoming shorter.  Knowing this to be impossible, the guide paid no attention until the rider complained again.  At a rest stop it was discovered the saddle had slipped back on the rump of the horse.

Sometimes all of the dude horses would be out of the corrals and one of the owners personal saddle horses would have to be used.  On one occasion at a rest stop, the dude climbed off on the right side of the horse instead of the left.  Never having had this happen before, the horse took off up the hill, bucking as he went!

Then there were occasions when horses “suck in air” when being saddled.  The cinch then loosens up when the horse releases the extra air.  One wrangler had a young mare in his party leaving camp one time when she suddenly left the trail and went bucking up the hillside.  It turned out the saddle blanket had worked back after the mare had released her “extra air intake.” The sliding saddle blanket touched her flanks and off she went!

So, how about it Old Timers, does this bring back memories of the Early Pack Train Days?

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Membership Application:

 

Havilah Centennial Group, Inc., dba

Havilah Historical Society & Museum

6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road, Havilah, CA 93518

www.havilahmuseum.org  Fiscal Year from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31

 

$25 Annual Dues for an Individual or a Family Membership (a family is 2 adults for voting purposes), will entitle members to receive notices via monthly newsletter, The Havilah Herald, of meetings, functions, and events.

 

Name________________________________________________________________________

Mailing Address_______________________________________________________________

Phone________________________________email___________________________________

Deliver newsletter (check one) by email______ or by snail-mail______

Date Application Submitted___________________________________

 

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Membership Renewal:

Havilah Centennial Group, Inc.

Havilah Historical Society & Museum

6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road, Havilah, CA 93518

www.havilahmujseum.org  Fiscal Year from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31

 

$25 Annual Dues for an Individual or a Family Membership (a family is 2 adults for voting purposes), will entitle members to receive notices via monthly newsletter, The Havilah Herald, of meetings, functions, and events.

 

Name________________________________________________________________________

Mailing Address_______________________________________________________________

Phone________________________________email___________________________________

Deliver newsletter (check one) by email______ or by snail-mail______

Date Renewal Submitted___________________________________

 

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THE CURRENT HAVILAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS:

President:         Al Price                              661/867-2414         email   havilahmuseum.org

Vice President  Larry Grafius                    661/867-2579

Secretary          Roy Fluhart                       928/308- 1863        email   rflu408@gmail.com

Treasurer          Jayne Hotchkiss-Price    661/867-2414         email   havilahmuseum.org

Directors (2)         Lana Grafius                661/867-2579

                             Wes Kutzner                  760/379-2636       email   kutznerwes@gmail.com

Past President &/Editor    Janet Kutzner   760/379-2636    email   kutznerwes@gmail.com

Annual membership is $25.00 per individual or family.  Membership year is from January 1 to December 31.

The Courthouse Museum and Schoolhouse are open from April 1 through Sep. 30 on weekends from 11 am until 3 pm, and by appointment.  They are located at 6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road, Havilah, CA 93518.

Admission to the museum is FREE, but donations are cheerfully accepted, (and 100% tax-deductible!).

The monthly general meeting is at 3 pm the second Saturday of each month at the Havilah Schoolhouse.

HAVILAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM

6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road

Havilah, CA 93518