The Havilah Herald

Official Publication of the Havilah Centennial Group, Inc.

aka The Havilah Historical Society and Museum

Havilah California – April 2019

A recognized 501 C 3 non-profit Historical Organization (all donations are tax-deductible)

Dedicated to the preservation of the history of Havilah,

The first County Seat of Kern County, CA

Our Purpose:

The purpose of this corporation is EDUCATIONAL. The organization has been formed and is maintained to research, document, preserve, and share the historic legacy of the town of Havilah, California, and of Kern County, California. Included in this purpose is the objective to provide for the advancement of education about the history of Havilah and early Kern County to the local community at large and to any and all visitors to the community.

 

The next General Meeting will be Saturday, April 13 at 3 pm at the Havilah Schoolhouse.  We welcome all members and their visitors.  Your input is needed to help keep our organization continuously running smoothly.  We will carry on with plans for our upcoming History Day in Havilah on October 26.  It’s not too early to be planning on how YOU can make this important event a huge success!

 

Welcome to new members Ken and Nancy Goss from Grants Pass, Oregon.  Nancy is the sister of our Secretary Roy Fluhart, and was a Havilah resident as a young girl.

 

Thank you to those who have remitted their dues for this year.  Also, thank you in advance to those who have not yet submitted their measly $25.00.  You’ll find a dues remittal form at the bottom of this newsletter.  Your generous contribution will help support our little old-west community!  You’ll be glad you did!

THE PREZ SEZ for APRIL

What are you doing with all of your spare time?  Silly question I know.  What “spare time”? You are probably like us, and belong to several other volunteer groups, but seriously, we could use your help.  We need several more volunteer docents (tour guides) for the museum.  Yup, we are only open from April through September each year, but that means 50 Saturdays and Sundays, and that’s not counting the “special requests” for tours during the week that occasionally pop up.

I also want to thank the current docents for all that you have done, and continue to do for us.  It is a BIG HELP!

We are looking forward to a really fun year this year.  Lastly (if that’s a word), we want to thank Bob Porter for starting to take care of our bee problem at the back of the Havilah Court House!  We are looking forward to being “bee-less” real soon. In the meantime, let’s stay away from back there until the work has been completed.  THANKS AGAIN BOB!

See you all at the next regular meeting, 3 pm on April 13th at the School house!

 

                                                                                      —- Prez. Al     *  *  *  *  *

 

 

BODIE  This excerpt is from the Book; Law of the Desert Born, 1983,

by well-known Western author, Louis L’Amour:

There was a time when a man with a few drinks under his belt who wished to impress people would proclaim himself a “Bad man from Bodie!”

Bodie, CA, was a rich camp, and a tough one.  On one day in 1880 they had three shootings and two stage holdups, and the town was just getting warmed up.  Another man noted six shootings in one week and made no mention of various knifings, cuttings, or other passages of arms.

In approximately three years, from 1879 to 1881, miners took something over $30 million in gold from the mines of Bodie.  Laundrymen were getting rich panning out the dirt they washed from miners’ clothing.

It is reported that Rough-and-Tumble Jack, Bodie’s first bad man, was explaining how tough he was when someone saw fit to challenge him.  He and his antagonist went outside and opened fire on each other at point-blank range.  Rough-and-Tumble Jack staggered back into the saloon, but his opponent, with one arm broken, reloaded his gun by holding it between his knees and then went back into the saloon and finished the job.  Jack became one of the first to bed down in Bodie’s Boot Hill.

About 5% of the town still remains, although fires in 1881 and 1932 took away many of its buildings. 

 

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AN IMPORTANT HISTORICAL SITE to American history from the 1930’s is the Havilah Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC) camp location.

This camp was established in 1933-34 in the Havilah area on Forest Service land.  The CCC camp location was coordinated with Frank Cunningham (Forest Supervisor) to establish a camp near Havilah.  Cunningham’s official correspondence with F. G. Munzer from Bakersfield states that, “In order to handle 200 men from one camp, it is necessary for us to place them where there is ample water, camping room…and work within a reasonable distance.  My present thought is to establish one camp in Havilah.”

The camp was established with orders to have an 80 foot warehouse, a guard station, ranger station and other various buildings built.  There is a list available from July 13, 1935 of individuals who worked in the Havilah and Bodfish camps or area.  This list is in the documents file and can be accessed by writing to the Sequoia National Forest for a copy.

Today the only surviving structure is the warehouse which is used as the garage both for fire engine 45 and the Breckenridge hotshot crew at Havilah.  Across the road and to the south of this standing structure are the remains of the original CCC camp built during the 1930’s.

The camp is no longer there, but the remains of foundations, depressions, and piping with artifacts still are.  Twenty-five different features were discovered.  These consist of latrines, root cellars, foundations of buildings with steps, walls and pits.   One of the structures is the dining hall/recreation hall, which has a complete side stair case of rock and cement with a retaining wall on the east side.

An entrance of similar dimension is on the north side with the remnants of a main fireplace in the background and a smaller interior side fireplace on the right.  These foundations are interesting and unique for they were made to stand the test of time.

Another structure called the Administration Hall has a large three-step entrance way.  Both of these structures and others have vanished except for these low lying stairways and sidewall foundations.  These foundations were all under about 1” of dirt with numerous bushes and trees growing in and around them.  A “sidewalk” from the Dining Hall north to the Administration Building is composed of local rock in a vertical pattern.

One can pass this area today and not even notice this feature due to overgrowth of grasses and bush.  The last structure to mention out of the numerous features is the boiler room.  Walls of milled wood were originally installed as confirmed by milled wood found along the sides.  The foundation has a central drain and boiler foundation in the middle portion of the structure.  It is interesting to note that after 75 years, inscriptions, prints and paint on the cement are still in evidence.

Editor’s note:  The above article was written by Mark L. Howe, Archeologist, Kern River Ranger District, Sequoia National Forest, in September, 2009.  This was during the 75th anniversary of the CCC.  Preservation of these historic artifacts and structures from the CCC days are important for our understanding of the history of Kern County and the areas we call home. 

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SUGAR AS A HEALING AGENT!  By Al Price

I was a Senior Safety Engineer and teacher of the Annual Employee Safety classes for many years at an Oil Refinery, and became a CERT Instructor up here for a few years after I retired in 2008,  ——- but I occasionally also learned from the students!

One of my students was a former baker (40 + years experience) when I was teaching basic first aid.  He told us that it is common for a baker to cut himself, and they don’t run to a doctor or even to the medicine cabinet.  He said they just put a little sugar on the cut – it doesn’t sting like the normal medications do, and his cuts always seem to heal faster and without any infection.  He said after they put sugar on it, and once the immediate bleeding stops, they cover it with a band aid. According to him this has been common for bakers to do ever since he can remember —- and beyond.

I did a little research on the Internet and found that this is a common remedy in many other parts of the world; it seems the sugar is there to remove water from the wound.  A bacterial infection needs three things to grow (like any living thing):  food, air, and water.  Deprive it of any of these and the growth will stop and the infection will die.  Sugar is a natural preservative in the same way as salt and vinegar are, all of which have been used for centuries to clean and heal wounds.  Sugar just happens to be the only one that doesn’t cause excruciating pain when rubbed into open wounds!  Yeah, just don’t pour vinegar or salt in the wound — it might work, but boy you’ll sure feel the pain! 

I’d never heard of this, but thought it might be worth passing on. 

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More Cowboy jokes:

Visitor:  ‘Wow, you have a lot of flies buzzing round your horses and cows.  Do you ever shoo them?’  Cowboy:  ‘No, we just let them go barefoot.’  *  *  *

What did the cowboy maggot say when he went into the saloon bar?  ‘Gimme a slug of whiskey.’  *  *  *

Why did the bowlegged cowboy get fired?  Because he couldn’t keep his calves together!  * ***

The cowboy lay sprawled across three entire seats in the posh Amarillo Theater.  When the usher came by and noticed this he whispered to the cowboy, “Sorry, sir, but you are only allowed one seat.”  The cowboy groaned but didn’t budge.  The usher became more impatient. “Sir, if you don’t get up from there, I’m going to have to call the manager.”  The cowboy just groaned.  The usher marched briskly back up the aisle.  In a moment he returned with the manager.  Together the two of them tried repeatedly to move the cowboy, but with no success.  Finally, they summoned the police.  The cop surveyed the situation briefly then asked, “All right buddy, what is your name?”  “Sam,” the cowboy moaned.  “Where ya from, Sam?”  With pain in his voice Sam replied… “The balcony.”  

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Membership Application (If you still want to join after those jokes!)

Havilah Centennial Group, Inc.

Havilah Historical Society & Museum

6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road, Havilah, CA 93518

www.havilahmuseum.org  Fiscal Year from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31

 

$25 Annual Dues for an Individual or a Family Membership (a family is 2 adults for voting purposes), will entitle members to receive notices via monthly newsletter, The Havilah Herald, of meetings, functions, and events.

 

Name________________________________________________________________________

Mailing Address_______________________________________________________________

Phone________________________________email___________________________________

Deliver newsletter (check one) by email______ or by snail-mail______

Date Application Submitted___________________________________

 

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Membership Renewal:

Havilah Centennial Group, Inc.

Havilah Historical Society & Museum

6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road, Havilah, CA 93518

www.havilahmujseum.org  Fiscal Year from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31

 

$25 Annual Dues for an Individual or a Family Membership (a family is 2 adults for voting purposes), will entitle members to receive notices via monthly newsletter, The Havilah Herald, of meetings, functions, and events.

 

Name________________________________________________________________________

Mailing Address_______________________________________________________________

Phone________________________________email___________________________________

Deliver newsletter (check one) by email______ or by snail-mail______

Date Renewal Submitted___________________________________

 

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THE CURRENT HAVILAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS:

President:         Al Price                          661/867-2414         email   havilahmuseum.org

Vice President  Larry Grafius                 661/867-2579

Secretary          Roy Fluhart                    928/308- 1863        email   rflu408@gmail.com

Treasurer          Jayne Hotchkiss-Price    661/867-2414         email   havilahmuseum.org

Directors (2)         Lana Grafius               661/867-2579

                             Wes Kutzner              760/379-2636       email   kutznerwes@gmail.com

Past President &/Editor    Janet Kutzner   760/379-2636    email   kutznerwes@gmail.com

Annual membership is $25.00 per individual or family.  Membership year is from January 1 to December 31.

The Courthouse Museum and Schoolhouse are open from April 1 through Sep. 30 on weekends from 11 am until 3 pm, and by appointment.  They are located at 6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road, Havilah, CA 93518.

Admission to the museum is FREE, but donations are cheerfully accepted, (and 100% tax-deductible!).

The monthly general meeting is at 3 pm the second Saturday of each month at the Havilah Schoolhouse.

HAVILAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM

6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road

Havilah, CA 93518