The Havilah Herald

Official Publication of the Havilah Centennial Group, Inc.

aka The Havilah Historical Society and Museum

Havilah California – June 2019

A recognized 501 C 3 non-profit Historical Organization (all donations are tax-deductible)

Dedicated to the preservation of the history of Havilah,

The first County Seat of Kern County, CA

Our Purpose:

The purpose of this corporation is EDUCATIONAL. The organization has been formed and is maintained to research, document, preserve, and share the historic legacy of the town of Havilah, California, and of Kern County, California. Included in this purpose is the objective to provide for the advancement of education about the history of Havilah and early Kern County to the local community at large and to any and all visitors to the community.

         

THE PREZ SEZ For June 2019

Gonna’ be really short this month because I have been tied up with E Clampus Vitus (ECV) activities.  Had 54 of my Redshirt Brothers over to our ranch for a campout (we call a Clampout) over Cinco de Mayo weekend.  The weather was beautiful, though a little cold for our “flatlander” brothers in the late evenings and early mornings.  Then May 16th through the 19th I had to attend an ECV Presidents’ meeting in Northern California, where the weather was anything but nice — it rained constantly for the four days, and only cleared up for a few hours on the 18th. But it was a mandatory meeting.

Back down here on the 19th, and like the rest of you, had to continue the weed whacking. Speaking of weed whacking, thank you to our Treasurer, Jayne, for hiring our handyman for trimming the weeds on both sides of the hills down by the creek out back of the Court House and School House.  It looks very nice!

Thanks also to our good member Bob Porter for his work on the bee problem behind the Court

House, and for fabricating security window guards for both the School house and the Court House!  I guess that’s it for now.  Thank you also to Larry Grafius for covering for me while I was gone.  (AND, for loaning me his 300 gal. water trailer for the Clampout at the ranch.  It saved us a lot of additional trips up to the ranch for water!

See you all at the next regular meeting, 3 pm on July 13th at the School House!

Just a reminder — 2019 Havilah membership dues ($25) were due six months ago — several members still need to send them in. Better yet, bring them in when you attend the next regular meeting!

—- Prez. Al

(From your Editor):  Today as I write this, it is Memorial Day.  While the following article perhaps might have been more appropriate for a May newsletter, I couldn’t wait until next year to share this with you.  Even if you are already familiar with it, you might wish to again reflect upon the following:

WHY WE FOLD THE FLAG 13 TIMES

Have you ever noticed how the honor guard pays meticulous attention to correctly folding the American flag 13 times?  Here’s what each of those 13 folds mean:

The 1st fold of our flag is a symbol of life.

The 2nd fold is a symbol of our belief in eternal life.

The 3rd fold is made in honor and remembrance of the veterans departing our ranks who gave a portion of their lives for the defense of our country to attain peace throughout the world.

The 4th fold represents our weaker nature, for as American citizens trusting in God, it is to Him we turn in times of peace as well as in time of war for His divine guidance.

The 5th fold is a tribute to our country, for in the words of Stephen Decatur, “Our Country”, in dealing with other countries, may she always be right; but it is still our country right or wrong.

The 6th fold is for where our hearts lie.  It is with our heart that We pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with Liberty and Justice for all.

The 7th fold is a tribute to our Armed Forces, for it is through the Armed Forces that we protect our country and our flag against all her enemies, whether they be found within or without the boundaries of our republic.

The 8th fold is a tribute to the one who entered into the valley of the shadow of death, that we might see the light of day.

The 9th fold is a tribute to womanhood, and Mothers.  For it has been through their faith, their love, loyalty and devotion that the character of the men and women who have made this country great has been molded.

The 10th fold is a tribute to the father, for he, too, has given his sons and daughters for defense of our country since they were first born.

The 11th fold represents the lower portion of the seal of King David and King Solomon and glorifies in the Hebrews’ eyes, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

The 12th fold represents an emblem of eternity and glorifies, in the Christians’ eyes, God the Father, the Son, and Holy Spirit.

The 13th fold, or when the flag is completely folded, the stars are uppermost reminding us of our nation’s motto, “In God We Trust.”

After the flag is completely folded and tucked in, it takes on the appearance of a cocked hat, reminding us of the soldiers who served under General George Washington, and the Sailors and Marines who served under Captain John Paul Jones, who were followed by their comrades and shipmates in the Armed Forces of the United States, preserving for us the rights, privileges and freedoms we enjoy today. 

                                                                                                                                             *  *  *  *  *

THE TONTO BASIN The following is another excerpt from the Book  “Law of the Desert Born“, 1983, by well-known Western author, Louis L’Amour:

Bounded on the north by the 2,000-foot Mogollon Rim, (pronounced Muggy Own by westerners), the Tonto Basin is a green and lovely area of pine forest, grassy meadows, running streams, and occasional springs.  To the old-timers much of what was referred to as the Tonto Basin actually lay outside of it, but it served to specify the locality.

It was the scene of several Indian battles, including those General Crook led against the Apaches, between the Tewksberry and Graham factions.

This is often referred to as a war between cattlemen and sheepmen, and certainly that was one element involved, but the Grahams and Tewksberrys had trouble before sheep entered the picture.  The number of people killed varies with the information available to the teller, but probably twenty-six men were killed during the war, and more likely twice that number.  The father of the Blevins boys disappeared during the fighting and was probably killed.  At one point, the fighting became so bitter that if a man saw a stranger, he shot him.  The idea was that if he wasn’t on my side, he had to be on the other or he wouldn’t be there.  Tom Horn was briefly involved.

Zane Grey had a cabin in the Basin.

Also in the Mogollon Rim country is the Double Circle Ranch, established about 1880.  On the ranch are the graves of four train robbers.  Hiding from the law, they had taken jobs on the Double-Circle and were trailed to the ranch by a posse accompanied by two Texas Rangers.  The outlaws made their fight, and four of them were buried where they fell.

No ranch in the area was safe from Apache raids, and outlaws were numerous.  Black Jack Christian operated in the area and had a hideout in a cave in Cole Creek Canyon, about twenty miles from Clifton.  Christian was killed not far from the cave.

Not far from the cave is a place known as Murder Camp, where Felix Burress was killed.  His murderer was traced to a line cabin in the mountains and captured.  He was sentenced to fifteen years in the Yuma prison. 

*  *  *  *  *

Following is another article from the Old Timer’s Column published in the Wofford heights; Kern River Valley Review, by The Ghost Writer (Edith Long, whose parents were Jim and Pearl Bechtel) on September 25, 1969:

Any of the old Timers that have been bouncing over the three miles of Sierra Way now under construction just below Kernville, certainly must be thinking they are back on the roads of years past!  The chuck holes, large rocks and a great deal of dust bring back memories of the roads of yesteryear.

The Construction Company has been plagued with Springs, along the hillside of part of the road and one of their large construction equipment bogged down in the mud from these springs.  Another piece of heavy equipment had to be brought in to pull it out.

The old road had its water problems too.  However, they were nothing as serious as those being encountered by the Construction Company today.  One stretch of the road between Old Isabella and Old Kernville ran along the bottom of a hill that carried the Edison Company Canal, just before cutting across the flat that Tilly Creek cut through.  The water from the canal would seep through the hillside so there was always water standing along the edge of the road.  The natives knew to steer clear of the edge to prevent getting stuck in the mud. 

This area was also a favorite place for skunks to roam at night..  Knowing this, the Old Timers knew to slow up at this stretch of road to avoid hitting one.  But the unwary tourist would invariably bump into one and as a result the Old Kernville residents could always smell the tourist’s car as it traveled through town!

In those days roads NEVER cut through anyone’s property like they do today.  Since this was cattle county, the roads went around each rancher’s property and were fenced on each side with barbed wire.  They were narrow and had sharp turns as the fences followed property lines.  Then too, the bridges over the irrigating ditches that crossed the roads were built up and over the ditch, making a sharp rise in the road.  This made any daring driver doing 35 or 40 miles per hour throw his passengers up to the top of the car causing them to hit their heads on the wooden supports in the car top.  How many of the Old Timers can remember just such an experience as a passenger in someone’s car?  Those were the days when safety belts were really needed!  The driver had the best of it as his hold on the steering wheel kept him anchored.  The bridges were just wide enough for one car to travel over at a time and the roads in the summer became onerut roads.  However, there were places where one could turn out to let the oncoming car pass, and it was customary for the car nearest the turn out to stop and wait for the other care to go on by.  Of course, if the other car contained friends one hadn’t seen for while, they would sit side by side on the road and catch up on the latest gossip of the Valley.  On the flat stretches of the roads where the driver could see ahead quite always he could really make time, but around the hills he slowed to a crawl and hoped there wasn’t some drunk coming around from the other side.  The biggest share of the accidents in those days were caused by those who had been imbibing Don Hanning’s Bootleg Booze.  One sharp hill-turn in the South Fork became known as Dead Man’s Curve.

Other accidents in those days were caused by the tourists hitting cattle that had gotten through fences and were wandering down the road, invariably deciding to cross as a car approached.  Those were the days when cattle had the right-of-way, and the cars were the intruders!

*  * ** *  *

MORE COWBOY JOKES:

Why did the cowboy die with his boots on? 

Because he didn’t want to stub his toe when he kicked the bucket. 

*  *  *

What do you call a cowboy with bad gas? 

Darn tootin’. 

*  *  *

A cowboy was trying to buy a health insurance policy. 

The insurance agent was going down the list of standard questions:  “Ever have an accident?”

 “Nope, nary a one.”

“You’ve never had any accident?” 

“Nope. Never had one.”

“Well, you said in this form you were bit by a rattlesnake once.  Wouldn’t you consider that an accident?”

“Heck no, that dang rattlesnake bit me on purpose

***********

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Membership Application:

 

Havilah Centennial Group, Inc.

Havilah Historical Society & Museum

6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road, Havilah, CA 93518

www.havilahmuseum.org  Fiscal Year from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31

 

$25 Annual Dues for an Individual or a Family Membership (a family is 2 adults for voting purposes), will entitle members to receive notices via monthly newsletter, The Havilah Herald, of meetings, functions, and events.

 

Name________________________________________________________________________

Mailing Address_______________________________________________________________

Phone________________________________email___________________________________

Deliver newsletter (check one) by email______ or by snail-mail______

Date Application Submitted___________________________________

 

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Membership Renewal:

Havilah Centennial Group, Inc.

Havilah Historical Society & Museum

6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road, Havilah, CA 93518

www.havilahmujseum.org  Fiscal Year from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31

 

$25 Annual Dues for an Individual or a Family Membership (a family is 2 adults for voting purposes), will entitle members to receive notices via monthly newsletter, The Havilah Herald, of meetings, functions, and events.

 

Name________________________________________________________________________

Mailing Address_______________________________________________________________

Phone________________________________email___________________________________

Deliver newsletter (check one) by email______ or by snail-mail______

Date Renewal Submitted___________________________________

 

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                           *                           *                           *                       *                    *

THE CURRENT HAVILAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS:

President:         Al Price                          661/867-2414         email   havilahmuseum.org

Vice President  Larry Grafius                 661/867-2579

Secretary          Roy Fluhart                    928/308- 1863        email   rflu408@gmail.com

Treasurer          Jayne Hotchkiss-Price    661/867-2414         email   havilahmuseum.org

Directors (2)         Lana Grafius               661/867-2579

                             Wes Kutzner              760/379-2636       email   kutznerwes@gmail.com

Past President &/Editor    Janet Kutzner   760/379-2636    email   kutznerwes@gmail.com

Annual membership is $25.00 per individual or family.  Membership year is from January 1 to December 31.

The Courthouse Museum and Schoolhouse are open from April 1 through Sep. 30 on weekends from 11 am until 3 pm, and by appointment.  They are located at 6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road, Havilah, CA 93518.

Admission to the museum is FREE, but donations are cheerfully accepted, (and 100% tax-deductible!).

The monthly general meeting is at 3 pm the second Saturday of each month at the Havilah Schoolhouse.

HAVILAH HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM

6789 Caliente-Bodfish Road

Havilah, CA 93518